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religion and politics with george will. next, a discussion on climate science, politics and global warming. panelists talked about what they think is next for the american west, texas, and north east due to climate change, and attitudes about science from the public. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you pu
not arrive in your lifetime. why do this because you're dead companion had lured you into science. in science is deliberate parenting. nonstop hurricane. according to the book in her lap, the first two rules are number one, the truth at any price, including the price of your life and number two, look at things as though you've never seen him before. then proceed from there. look at things that everyone takes for granted and then see what you learn. so the next big question will be more important than the next answer. new questions can produce scientific links. insights that nine years later, a guy we'll call for a pure and i'm sure. it becomes your mission. finding the question that will produce the next big perception. an unfolding this point that will allow others to radically pursue how did god get into the picture? the bar mitzvah is coming up in your 12 years old. your dad is going through a party for all the kids that you know, all the kids who humiliate you three quarters of a mile from your home. this time you are invited. yes, you are invited and this is the first time you will atten
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> a discussion on climate science and politics. paul by director of nasa's goddard institute of space studies. another look at religion and politics. tomorrow, we are joined by the indiana rep. he will talk about the 113th congress in his priorities. join us sunday at 10:00 eastern and again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> as president obama begins his second term, what is the most important issue? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, make a video about your message to the president. is your chance to win $5,000. the deadline is january 18. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> next a discussion on climate science, politics, and global warming. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here. welcome. seven years ago, there was a consensus in washington that the earth's atmosphere could be altered. it is a different story. over the next hour, we will discuss opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 201
continue the discussion on climate science now with james hanson, head of the nasa institute for space studies and author of "storms of my grandchildren." he was awarded an award named for the scientist who advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment.
i don't think that you actually talk climate science 26 hours a day. but could you tell us a little bit of your conversations with sophie? thank you. >> yeah. so i don't think that it's appropriate to frighten children. [laughter]. and i -- so the only thing that -- until -- now, sophie is -- i have five grandchildren, sophie is the oldest, and finally, i am starting to explain the problem and the fact that there are solutions. but, other than that, i just -- the only thing that i've really done with grandchildren related to this is to try to help them understand nature. so for -- in particular, as i mentioned in my book, we have addressed the monarch butterfly problem. you know, a monarch butterfly as we've noticed on our farm, they are many fewer than they used to be, and that's mainly because not of global warming, but because of pesticides which have been used to reduce the number of milkweeds. and that -- so, therefore, with my grandchildren, we plant milkweeds. and then they learn about this remarkable life cycle of monarch butterflies which migrate all the way to mexico. well
have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to bring our values and to it.
. and now the question is, with running science in order to expand science which is what i have done, then okay, now the normal credentialing process to take it seriously. [inaudible] >> to bring everything back down a little bit to the pragmatic, i don't have a science background but i am a political science -- and i was struck with the wave in the comparison of it with the stock market which is hanging around in the back of my head, and i haven't read it yet but the idea of lots of discrete entities doing things, creating something larger with or without people, with or without that intention of creating something larger. is this already being done, to apply this to policy say you know okay we want to do this. we are doing it this way but it's not working or all of these actions we are taking are somehow creating this other thing that we haven't even thought about. i feel like there could he and education, sort of guide to how we would put recruitment strategies or how to use them as a tool in other fields? >> i think you're absolutely right in that is why had done this thing up di
, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn, those exposures are out t
, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. people will be self interested. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, what is the worst that can
, lassie. those science fictions magazines have certainly made an impression on him. well let's face it, ruth, this is the space age and timmy's part of it. oh yes, but flying saucers and men from mars, now really it's a little preposterous isn't it? maybe. maybe not. a few years ago we never would have dreamed that we would have had man made satellites, now we're preparing to send men into space. never can tell about some things. strangers come to a foreign planet, and nobody even cares. you saw it with me didn't ya, lassie? it was a flying saucer. ♪ ♪ ♪ they must have landed here and blasted off again. what is it girl? feet prints. lots of them. men from other planets can disappear if they want too. maybe they'll believe us now. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ dad! in that barn son. i found the place where it landed, i knew we saw it last night i knew we did. what did you see? where what landed? the flying saucer. timmy. but it's true mom. there's a big hole where it landed and blasted off again. these little feet prints all around it. feet prints? no, it's...well, i guess that's right.
that kind much an attention span. >> this is not rocket science. we are making trig nomety out of arethetic. >> take away the cell phones and computers f. it is not internet its it something else. it helps them with learning. >> julian, thank you for being with us. >> coming up. >> the stuff that will pop >> the stuff that will pop after the ball drops and get [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking foreign language] [heart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... ♪ announcer: this song was created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help ontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmattersorg. >> time for special do i need to know? >> dr companies take a long time to get from the nation place to the market place. i own it and talked about it in the past. this year will be a
the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and
to me. i said to do this, to have an endangerment finding, you have to have it based on science. what science would you use? she said, we would use the united nations the inter governmental panel on climate change. it cooperate have been better -- it couldn't have been better timing. you talk about poetic justice, governor, it was a matter of days that clay mat gate came in. remember climate gate? it shows without a shadow of the doubt that the united nations has been cooking this science for a long period of time. >> it is amazing. when you bring these things to light a lot of americans are shocked to realize that you and the last few in the senate may be the last backstop before this administration takes us into some international treaty, international law, international agreement that none of us really would ever agree to. >> there are people i serve with who think it is not a good idea. what about our sovereignty? that's what it is all about. nonetheless, this did come from them. you have to keep in mind that -- you and i can both remember when the democrats' primary source of fun
that kind much an attention span. >> this is not rocket science. we are making trig nomety out of areth metic. >> take away the cell phones and computers f. its not inrnet it is it something else. it helps them with learning. >> julian, thank you for being with us. >> coming up. >> the stuff that will pop >> the stuff that will pop after the ball drops andet [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >> time for special do i need to know? >> drug companies take a long time to get from the nation place to the market place. i own it and talked about it in the past. this year will be
that is what we try to challenge. a report card last year but also to look at math and science with high-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a
that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the republican strategy for securing a romn
a cad -- academy of arts and sciences and sits on the board for the huffington post. adviced hillary clinton on technology and society, produced several films and named by "newsweek," as, quote, one of the women shaping the 21st century. she is a parent and is focused on making an impact, especially in our everyday use of technology and connection and her newest film is called "engage." take a look. [ speaking spanish ] >> that is your life clock. some day it's going to stop. a lot of things are going happen in the world between now and then, so what are you going to do while you're here? stand on the sidelines? or are you going to be part of something bigger? give a little bit, give a little bit of my life for you give a little bit, give a little bit of your life to me. >> tiffany, welcome back. you always are so fascinating to me. you're constantly re-inventing yourself. do you ever run out of new ideas? >> right now, i'm in a fertile period. and i'm always interested in the same thing and that is basically the internet. >> uh-huh. >> and how do we be mindful of how we're living in
everybody knows that it has nothing to do with science and yet japanese fleets travel from one side of the globe to another to engage in this and to break the moratorium year after year. >> the sea shepherd conservation society is on a boat planning to intercept the fleet saying a moratorium should be enforced. >> they should be enforcing this, but the international commission really does not have any teeth. there is no economic or political motivation for them to do so. there's no difference between what the japanese are doing and what elephant poachers are doing in kenya accept that in kenya, they are black, poor, and get shot for what they're doing. australia could send the military and escort them out of the area. there's a lot of trade deals and money at stake. japan is a very strong economic superpower a.m. they tend to get what they want. >> the global financial crisis has left millions of people without jobs. in south korea, youth unemployment is at nearly 7%. one group of graduates have come up with an unusual way to address the problem. >> it is a difference now let the 20
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> but what shouldn't change from the original constitution of america, surely. >> my faith isn't based on the constitution, it's based on -- >> i get that. but america in terms of its populism, it's about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie, daniel day lewis is brilliant as lincoln. but all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery apolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was perfectly acceptable. who was outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular at the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> right, but we had this discussion. >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says every man should be free. >> but you don't believe every man should be free and equal? >> of course we're free and of course we're equal. you can love anybody you want to. >> but
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> we're going to turn now, to our "consumer watchdog" tonight. and this internet scam thriving this holiday season. fbi reporting tonight with more than 150,000 stranded traveler complaints. and here's abc's elisabeth leamy now. >> reporter: it came from halfway around the world. a frightening e-mail that landed in an abc producer's inbox. it looked like it was from a friend. "my trip to manila, philippines, with my family has been a mess. i was hit at the back of my neck with a club. i need you to loan me some money." was this real or a hoax? skeptical, our producer decided to play along. "okay, don't worry." i think i can come up with a few hundred at least." we wired just 20 the con artist picked up the money within hours and c
it well and a grown man can never master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" if any of us had a moment where arnold pa
in the movie with basic science raises a point that mark describes it that the synoptic gos members, matthew, mark, luke and john, do not suggest the basis for the extreme, the savagery that we see in the motion picture, correct? >> not at all. you can really only find one lines in the gospels about jesus being lashed and whipped. and all that scourging that we see in the film and that takes about 45 minutes in the movie. >> spell that out a little bit. in matthew there is mention of being scourged before taken to the hill, that is the auous process to get there, he was crowned with thorns, he was spit upon or smote or hit on the head. >> we certainly don't get a sense of the violence that attends the trial and the execution of jesus. we don't get that in the gospels at all. >> there's no mention -- let me clarify, there's no mention of scourging in john. and that brings us to another interesting question that we can raise with you and we're joined on the live line and he's actually been listeni to us and he may choose to comment on what you've said thus far david brickner who is the executi
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. 150 years. she keeps you guessing. it's part of what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives, swelling of the l
are talking about. >> absolutely. let's say that you are a young indian or chinese entrepreneur with a science degree or engineering degree and you gradua from mit. you want to start a high-tech company. would you started in the united states, where you're getting from your company years down the road will be taxed at 30%, or would you started in china or india where the capital gains tax rate is zero? many of our major partners have zero capital gains tax rates. if you are an entrepreneur or an investment and growth company, you would rather put your money there than in the united states in the future, which is really unfortunate. gerri: okay, let's talk about companies a little bit here. these tax rates are critical to growing companies. >> that's absolutely right. apple and microsoft, for example, benefited early on from highncome individuals pumping and a few hundred thousand dollars to help those companies get started and grow. those high income people could alternively put their money in and say tax-free muni bonds. if we raise the capital gains tax rates, which people are going to say,
for a world in which science fiction is rapidly becoming science fact. >> we were put here to to touch, to smell, to taste, to see and to hear the universe. that's a great role. that's a great responsibility. >> osgood: it took more than just rocket fuel to propel sally ride into orbit. as america's first woman in space, she was a role model for those who dream of shooting for the stars. earl scruggs, he aimed high. his picking elevated the five-string bang owe from second fiddle status to star of the show. ♪ (andy griffith theme). >> reporter: no doubt you remember this tune. andy griffiths' may bury recalled our own hometowns as we remember them or wish they could have been. >> if you ever come by this way again, be sure and stop by. i hope you have more time though. we don't like to see folks hurrying through like this. >> osgood: he was something of a friend, one we'll remember for a long time to come. so long, andy. ♪ at last ♪ my love has come >> osgood: we leave it to you, the great etta james to close out our tribute to those who left us in 2012. we only wish we had a bit
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast. [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. remark able news on a story i told you about at 5:00, we had just been told that teresa nash, the mother of two missing georgia boys has been contacted by her sons. after our interview, the boys apparently called her and told her they were in austin texas. she made her plea right here on our show. >> the children, please call mommy, you know my phone number, i have taught you how to do it, if daddy doesn't have a phone, you can ask anybody you see, everybody you see has a phone, you can ask anybody, remember my number and call mommy's number, you can ask people in stores. you can ask people in the gas station, you can ask people anywhere you se
ultratight skinny jeans so many women are wearing these days. abc7 news anchor and health and science reporter carolyn johnson has our story. >>> check out my skinny jeans. >> christine's closet is full of so-called skinny jeans, tightfitting and versatile. >> you can wear the boots over in winter and in the daytime you can wear them with like flats or drive them up at night. >> she admits it's sometimes a struggle squeezing into them. >> they can be hard to get on because you are obviously trying to pull them up. >> but more than an inconvenience, some doctors warn that an overly tight fit could actually cause nerve damage. >> it's called -- a nerve in the outer part of the thigh gets compressed and pressure on it causes symptoms of continuingling, numbness and pain. >> the doctor said women can even experience symptoms without realizing the cause. >> one woman described it as sort of a floating sensation when she was walking. her thighs kind of felt weak and continuingly and she got pain in the thighs. >> she said combining the jeans with ultrahigh heels can worsen the effect. >> be
skinny jeans so many of us are wearing these days. abc7 news anchor and health and science reporter carolyn johnson has our story. >>> check out my skinny jeans. >> christine's closet is full of so-called skinny jeans, tight-fitting and versatile. >> you can wear the boots over in winter and in the daytime you can wear them with like flats or drive them up at night. >> she admits it's sometimes a struggle squeezing into them. >> they can be hard to get on because you are obviously trying to pull them up. >> but more than an inconvenience, some doctors warn that an overly tight fit could actually cause nerve damage. >> it's called maralgia parastetica . it's a disorder that occurs when one of the nerves that runs in the outer part of the thigh gets compressed and the pressure on it causes symptoms of tingling, numbness and pain. >> the doctor said women can even experience symptoms without realizing the cause. >> one woman described it as sort of a floating sensation when she was walking. her thighs kind of felt weak and tingley and she got pain in the thighs. >> she said combining t
and health and science reporter carolyn johnson has our story. >>> check out my skinny jeans. >> christine's closet is full of so-called skinny jeans, tight-fitting and versatile. >> you can wear the boots over in winter and in the daytime you can wear them with like flats or drive them up at night. >> she admits it's sometimes a struggle squeezing into them. >> they can be hard to get on because you are obviously trying to pull them up. >> but more than an inconvenience, some doctors warn that an overly tight fit could actually cause nerve damage. >> it's called maralgia parastetica, where a nerve in the outer part of the thigh gets compressed and pressure on it causes symptoms of tingling, numbness and pain. >> the doctor said women can even experience symptoms without realizing the cause. >> one woman described it as sort of a floating sensation when she was walking. her thighs kind of felt weak and tingly and she got pain in the thighs. >> she said combining the jeans with ultrahigh heels can worsen the effect. >> because the pelvis tilts some, it can further accentuate the pressure ca
approach. i mean, it's not rocket science to see that we have a democratic senate, a republican house and a democratic president, and that's going to be the same starting january 3 of next year for at least two more years. so we know what we're dealing with, and i think it affects us right now in the fiscal cliff negotiations because we are not going to do anything unless it is bipartisan. we will not be able to pass anything in the house that doesn't have significant republican votes in the senate, and the democrats in the senate are not going to be able to support something that won't require some votes of democrats in the house. so we are together, maybe it's like a dysfunctional family, but we do have to work together because without bipartisanship, nothing is going anywhere. therefore, i think you have to go back to negotiations 101. which is that someone in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the other party in a negotiation has to win some and lose some. the president is not going to get everything he wants. the republicans in the house and senate are not going to get
this freakish weather and all the sciences is so overwhelming about claimant count yet you don't see on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab by the scruff of the neck during her tenure at abc and say, we've got to cover this more? >> there were several. we would have discussions about. one of them was the environment and how we covered the environment. and every time we try to do a primetime special environment we wouldn't get a rating. that led, it's one of the chapters i write about, what i do not come across well. we had leonardo dicaprio india president clinton. we got killed for it. we did a primetime environmental special, and he was chairman of earth day that you and i thought he would just make an appearance. i got killed for. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment in a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more terrorism coverage than others did before 9/11. jon miller went in and interviewed bin laden, trekked into the mountains in afghanistan and interviewed him. we get a primeti
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
how far advanced they've been in the sciences. the chinese religion to today did flirt with communism for a number of years, but they turned it became capitalists because basically they are all from the cultures of creativity. so i agree with you. one which i forgot to mention was the cicada craze of the religion with christianity when the slaves went to the americas and found themselves being banned from studying and following their religion. they say yes master, we won't follow the old religion, but they just substituted the same for their deities. so until today you'll find shock of the, shall coup, one of the ceiling fan rbd at the candles, et cetera, et cetera. they went through that cicada craze and even evolved to mean simply created images of their deities and stylized mode so that they could claim that this figure stood for the same because that is how accomplished they were creating to human beings. until today you find this a credit freeze existing, but also there is another phase, which is very, very prominent, where there was a revolt that was christianity, go away. and t
of quotations spreading science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist, the antifeminist because he was the leader for women's rights women's rights in the anti-imperialist and can service. he said america's fascist think wall street comes first in the american people come second. he had enemies and those enemies wanted to get rid of him on the ticket. the problem was he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944 the night the convention starts the potential potus who they wanted on the ticket as vice president, 65% said they wanted wallace on the ticket in 2% wanted harry truman so the question where how worth it party bosses going to take to this? when they wanted to get wallace off the ticket roosevelt says to him my support wallace but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough and i'm depending on you to do it. they finally gave in and it was terrible that he did. his family was serious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with him. every single one of the roosevelt kids were furious with him. wallace had the backi
eight years and the facility is going to cut about $10 million go behind the science museum of virginia and there will be a field house with locker and weight rooms and a drill fold and spectator areas. sports is next when the news at 10 returns. high praise for the other redskins rookie who could have a franchise record tomorrow night against the cowboys. lindsay murphy is next with sports. tucker. >> the snowstorm is out of here and left in its wake, a lot of wind. you have that less than 33 here in washington and hagerstown. blustery overnight and window sunday. the details on the weather forecast. including the redskins game sunday night and new year's eve monday night.  . >>> how many games has rg3 won for the wizards? >> reporter: think technically, two o. on. >> i think technically two. >> yeah. >> he was there when they played the miami heat. >> oh, my goodness. >> last night, the wizards were like in the fourth quarter and throwing free-throws and a chance rang out. >> yes. >> and everybody was around like where is he? >> right. >> and rg3 is super, too and ev
with virginia. the facility going to cost about $10 million. it will be built behind the science museum of virginia. two football fields, a locker room with a weight room. a drill field and spectator area. >>> the looming fiscal cliff with republican lindsey graham and dianne feinstein and the benghazi attack. a preview when we come back. >>> gwen tolbart will be back with the workweek preview. stay with us. we will be right back. it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >>> the so-called fiscal cliff is looming. a live look now at the capitol where lawmakers held negotiations into the night and early this morning. they will be con convening -- convening once aga
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. red jars are all the same right? wrong! you need three uses of a $15 cream to equal the moisturizing power of one use of regenerist microsculpting cream. seems not all red jars are created equal. olay regenerist. >>> back with our roundtable discussion on the fiscal cliff and your money. ron brownstein is cnn's political analyst and editorial director of the national journey. stephen moore, senior economics writer at the "wall street journal" and necessary washington. joining must new york is todd showen berger from land capital. we showed a poll most americans want people to compromise. no purr surprise there why can't republicans and democrats get their act together and compromise? >> well, i think this previous discussion we were just having is kind of an example of what's happening in congress is, you know, democrats, liberal democrats really believe that taxes don't matter around they can continue to raise them as high as they want. i happen to think they are critically important. i think
? will we get something more in line with what the president want up science. >> i hope for a by partisan solution to pass. >> beyond the hope, do you think the chances are good? >> we're not there yet. we're trying to line up rubik's cube right now. this will continue until tomorrow. my goal is to help keep tax rates down for all americans. i think it hurts our economy if tax rates go up. that's why i'm concerned for the future and the growth of our economy and jobs. >> what is your all's sense of something that could pass what appears even from the first part of the conversation? the divides line is so bright. >> i'm optimistic, candy. i am he. i think the practical reality is come january 1 we begin to see the average middle class family having their taxes go up about $2200. one mom said to me in michigan, that's four months of groceries. that's commuting back and forth to work in gas for up to three years. i mean, that's a lot of money. i really do think even though there's great divides about the role of the wealthy in the country and whether she should be part of the solution, i do
they normally wear. it was just like a science-fiction moment. it's like, what happened to all the men? i became curious about that. because i am a reporter, you know that once you get an idea in your head and you really can't let go. as a friend of this woman in the supermarket, her name was bethany, i bumped into her and started talking. i said, what's up? are you married? she was not married. though she had a daughter. and she began to talk to me about the guy was the father of her daughter and how -- she herself was working, she was going to school to become a nurse, she was raising a child and she began to talk about things in a disparaging way. which is well we don't live with calvin because he would be another mouth to feed. that was her argument. of course, she and i had a sisterhood bonding at that moment. but i wanted to know who calvin lies. so i got his phone number and calvin and i started at become friends. what happened to these men? what's going to happen to them? i don't know if you know that old ladies home journal column, can this marriage be saved, where you try to figure out
, and how the landscape might look for 2013. we have a political science professor, and danny vargas, president and ceo of the communications and marketing firm. welcome to "viewpoint," to you all. >> happy new year. >> i want to take a big picture look back at 2012, and go around and ask each of you what 2012 would be remembered for? >> my background is in politics, so i would have to go with the presidential election, barack obama being re-elected not withstanding some significant economic concerns going into the beginning of 2012, or a year ago at the end of 2011, it was clear the president would have an uphill battle. and three things struck me as interesting. super packs, the billions raised to reshape voter thinking, and particularly senate and house races, you saw a real impact -- >> in our region. >> absolutely in our region. and that was the first thing that struck me, and the second was turnout. i was among those that believed the president would get 95 or 96% of the african-american vote, and it turned out to be the same. and the same with young voters. and nobody expected
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's so great to see you. you, too! oh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! actually, honey, i think i did... oh? you did? whoa, ladies, easy. hi. cascade kitchen counselor. we can help avoid this with cascade complete pacs. see, over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum. to help leave glasses sparkling shiny! too bad it doesn't work on windows. okay, i'm outta here. cascade. the clear choice. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell
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